established 1942
Home

Roman marble statue of Aphrodite Kallipygos Roman marble statue of the nude Aphrodite
Roman marble statue of the nude Aphrodite IMPORTANT ROMAN MARBLE STATUE OF APHRODITE KALLIPYGOS ("APHRODITE OF THE BEAUTIFUL BUTTOCKS")

The goddess of erotic love with her left hand raised over her head, lifting her garment to expose her nude posterior.

1st-2nd Century AD

H. 36 5/8 in. (93.2 cm.)

Ex Emmaneule Segredakis (1890-1948), Paris, ca. 1940; G.M. collection, Paris; Jean-Loup Depras, Paris; Dr. E. collection, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in 2000.

Published: K. Parlasca, Aphrodite Kallipygos, Scriptorum 2007, fig. 6; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, 2014, no. 7.

Cf. for the type: Naples Museum, no. 288, pub: S. Reinach, Repertoire de la Statuaire Grecque et Romaine, vol. I, p.328, fig. 611, 1916. To the best of our knowledge, this sensual sculpture is one of only five known marble examples of which three are just fragments. The Naples example is heavily restored. Our "Aphrodite of the beautiful buttocks" is by far the most complete example known.

ER1201CM
P.O.R.


Sales



FULL-SCREEN FLASH SLIDESHOW



From the Wikipedia page:

The Venus Callipyge, also known as the Aphrodite Kallipygos or the Callipygian Venus, all literally meaning "Venus (or Aphrodite) of the beautiful buttocks", is an ancient Roman marble statue, thought to be a copy of an older Greek original. In an example of anasyrma, it depicts a partially draped woman, raising her light peplos to uncover her hips and buttocks, and looking back and down over her shoulder, perhaps to evaluate them. The subject is conventionally identified as Venus (Aphrodite), though it may equally be a portrait of a mortal woman.

The marble statue extant today dates to the late 1st century BC. The lost Greek original on which it is based is thought to have been bronze, and to have been executed around 300 BC, towards the beginning of the Hellenistic era. The provenance of the marble copy is unknown, but it was rediscovered, missing its head, in the early modern era. The head was restored, first in the 16th century and again in the 18th century (in which case the sculptor followed the earlier restoration fairly closely); the restored head was made to look over the shoulder, drawing further attention to the statue's bare buttocks and thereby contributing to its popularity. In the 17th and 18th centuries the statue was identified as Venus and associated with a temple to Aphrodite Kallipygos at Syracuse, discussed by Athenaeus in his Deipnosophists. The statue was copied a number of times, including by Jean-Jacques Clérion and François Barois.
Roman marble statue of the nude Aphrodite Roman marble statue of the nude Aphrodite
Roman marble statue of the nude Aphrodite Roman marble statue of the nude Aphrodite

Search Royal-Athena
copyright